Prenuptial agreements have been around since legal marriage has been around, more or less. However, in American history, prenuptials have historically been reserved for the rich and famous or potentially those who have been married multiple times. However, in the modern era, it is becoming more and more common for younger persons of middle-class means to get a prenup prior to marriage. Not every marriage requires a prenup, but there are several benefits to having one in place. According to Business Insider, there are three specific situations where a prenup should seriously be considered by the couple.

The first is if one or both partners have any investments or plan to invest. Possessing retirement accounts or stock options may mean that a prenup can help provide a blueprint on how to manage these assets in the event of divorce. However, investments may not simply be limited to traditional options: if one party of the marriage owns a business, a prenuptial agreement can protect that business in the event of divorce.

Another (and probably the most traditional) reason to get a prenup is if one partner comes into the marriage with considerably more assets than the other. For instance, if one partner is an heir or heiress to a large fortune, getting a prenuptial agreement can help protect these assets. On the other hand, if one partner makes considerably less money than the other, getting a comprehensive prenuptial agreement can assure the dependent partner receives a fair amount of alimony.

Finally, having any sort of family plans may make a prenuptial agreement enticing. Particularly if one spouse is planning on being a stay-at-home parent, a prenuptial agreement can financially protect that parent.