201-500-8914


Call Today For A Free Initial Consultation
Schepisi & McLaughlin, P.A.
Main Site Navigation

Posts tagged "Property Division"

Dealing with inherited IRAs during a divorce

Individual retirement accounts have long been an important asset and bargaining chip for divorcing spouses in New Jersey and around the country, but there are no regulations, official rulings or Internal Revenue Service guidelines dealing with how inherited IRAs should be handled during property division talks. However this has not prevented family law judges from approving divorce settlements that divide inherited IRAs, and IRA custodians, who may not wish to defy a court order, are complying with the provisions of these agreements.

Dividing retirement plans properly during a divorce

Couples in New Jersey who are getting a divorce can end up with unpleasant surprises if they divide their retirement assets in the wrong way. To avoid high penalties, unexpected tax bills and an ex-spouse receiving a higher share than intended, it is important that spouses are aware of how different retirement accounts should be treated.

Valuing a business during a divorce

Property division negotiations sometimes become contentious when New Jersey couples file for divorce, and this can be especially true when a family business is one of the assets being discussed. Such commercial ventures are often run by one of the spouses involved, and non-operating spouses frequently believe that the business is far more profitable than it actually is. Thorny matters generally include the value of the enterprise and how much income it generates each month.

Divorce and selling a home

New Jersey couples who are getting a divorce might need to sell their home. This happens in almost two-thirds of divorce cases. It is not always possible for one spouse to buy out the other. There are several things couples can do to make this process go more smoothly despite the emotional difficulties that accompany it.

Dividing IRAs during divorce requires special attention

People in New Jersey facing the end of their marriages are already dealing with the emotional and psychological fallout of divorce. Of course, another aspect of divorce is also the financial aspect: dividing assets and debts and dealing with the distribution of various types of property. From real estate to retirement savings, all kinds of financial assets and investments are subject to property division during divorce.

What happens to the marital home after a divorce

When New Jersey couples are going through a divorce, one of the most important subjects that might have to be discussed in property division negotiations is the marital home. They will have to reach an agreement about who will get to keep the home or whether they will sell it instead.

Deciding who gets the house after a divorce

For some individuals getting a divorce in New Jersey, getting out of the family home is an important part of moving on to a fresh start. In other cases, spouses may have strong reasons for wanting to remain in the family home after the end of their marriage. Because the value of a home is often quite high, real estate division can be a sore point in divorce proceedings.

Making decisions about a mortgage during a divorce

While divorce is often the best option for many couples, the process of dissolving a marriage can still be difficult. One of the biggest challenges those in New Jersey and other states face when divorcing is how to handle the house and a mortgage. This applies when a house is joint property, and there are a number of options available.

Understanding finances during divorce

Some people in New Jersey who are divorcing may have never dealt with the family finances or may not know much about them. Even financially savvy people might benefit from the assistance of a financial planner at such a time. A financial planner may be able to address and assist with a number of unique situations that may arise during the proceedings.

Dealing with finances during and after a divorce

When a New Jersey couple gets divorced, it is not just their relationship that changes. For many people, financial upheaval is also likely since individuals will not only be splitting up their assets but will no longer benefit from two incomes. It is important for people to take inventory of their assets and debts and separate any joint accounts shared with their spouse to help them prepare for life after their marriage ends.