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Child Custody Archives

Helping kids thrive when parents divorce

When New Jersey parents decide to divorce, they may be concerned about how to best help their children navigate this transition. Divorce can stir up a lot of complicated emotions for children. Some may fear that their parents will abandon them or stop loving them. Others may struggle with the practical changes, like moving from one parent's home to the other on a regular basis. Divorce will almost certainly cause a significant amount of change and disruption in a child's life. However, parents can take action to help make the divorce process less traumatic and healthier for their children.

Co-parenting and sharing child custody in the summer

Two-household summers can be stressful for children with divorced parents in New Jersey. This is also a time when there's no longer the structure of school and other routines that normally fit neatly into a prearranged scheduled. However, summers can still be relaxing and enjoyable for children sharing time with both parents who take the right approach to co-parenting.

What to consider before taking a child overseas

New Jersey parents who are divorced are usually allowed to spend time with their kids without their former spouses present. In some cases, this involves taking a child to another country. Ideally, exes will include the terms of such travel in their parenting plan. At a minimum, both parents should know where their kids are going to be at all times. This can be done by providing an itinerary before leaving on the trip.

Moms and dads are more likely to share custody these days

When parents of younger children get divorced in New Jersey, custody decisions have to be made. At one time, mothers were far more likely to be favored in custody-related matters. Moms still tend to get more custody time, but there has been a noticeable shift over the years toward shared parenting arrangements. In fact, one study covering this topic shows that mothers were granted sole custody roughly 80% of the time in the early 1980s. Nearly 30 years later, mothers assumed full parenting duties about 40% of the time.

Gathering the right paperwork for a child custody hearing

In some cases, a parent can win a child custody hearing by knowing what types of evidence to bring. When a case begins, each side will have the opportunity to state their position in writing. If the other parent initiates the case, an individual will have the right to see exactly what he or she is using as the basis to do so. Including as many documents as possible can be helpful in making a good first impression with a judge.

Getting back child visitation rights

It can be a very trying time for parents who have been denied child visitation. However, before making any decisions about which steps to take in response, New Jersey parents who are prohibited from seeing their children should first understand why the court has taken away their visitation rights. They should then explore all of their legal options.

Planning a workable parenting schedule after a divorce

It's not uncommon for divorced parents in New Jersey to squabble. Still, there is often a need to put personal animosity aside when working out a post-divorce parenting schedule. Taking this step could make the transition to a different living arrangement easier for the kids. First of all, a suitable parenting schedule should always be focused on a child's best interests.

Issues that commonly decide child custody cases

When parents in New Jersey or any other state choose to end their relationship, they must still take an active role in raising their children together. Parents may be granted custody based on their mental and financial stability as well as their ability to raise a child. In some cases, the children themselves will get a chance to voice their opinion in a custody hearing.

Tips for divorced parents to enjoy the holiday season

Many divorced parents in New Jersey struggle with emotional distress related to the dissolution of a marriage, but the holidays can be especially difficult in shared child custody situations. Children often want to spend time with both parents and their extended family members over the holidays, but time is usually tight, and stress is already high. This creates anxiety for both parents and children, and it can also be difficult to explain to children that custody and visitation orders are still in effect during the holiday season.

The advantages and disadvantages of nesting after divorce

Some parents in New Jersey who are getting a divorce might consider a custody arrangement called "birdnesting" or "nesting." This arrangement involves the children remaining in the family home while their parents rotate in and out. The parents maintain another place they live in when they are not staying with their children. Usually, this is a small apartment.